Cathedral Ledge Rock Climbing

Kavu – Klear Above Visibility Unlimited!!!

Yes it was that type of day. For Jerry and I this meant revisiting a few of the local test pieces at Cathedral Ledge. We found ourselves at the Barber Wall in the early morning for a run on the steep slanting route named  Chicken Delight. This is a delight of a crack for sure as we found out in a short time!!!

Our move from here took us down to Diedre – a classic 5.9 route. Cracks, corners, chimney moves and a roof or two – this route keeps on giving right up to the last move. Jerry was on fire as he sent each pitch, by mid afternoon we were on top. Our hands and arms were feeling the punch for sure.

A bit to early to call it a day so we opted for one final pitch on They Died Laughing. We certainly laughed during this day, tons of good moves and lots of fun was had!!!


Jerry lay backing on the Chicken Delight.


A bit of scrappy 5.6 to start Diedre.


A problematic roof for many, unlocking a tricky sequence will get you across.

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Jerry completing the final roof moves onto the belay ledge.

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This is the sustained classic 5.8/9 corner. Beautiful rock, great moves, a steep pitch – this one is a gem.


Jerry pulling into the final move to the top.


Steep moves lead to a jam – then a scrappy mantle to top out.


Taped hands did the trick.


They Died Laughing – North End Cracks.

Awesome day on the granite cracks!!!

Thanks Jerry

Art Mooney

The adventure begins – here is the entire Cody, Barr and Hall team on top of the summit of Welsh and Dickey.

This was a very special trip – the MMG guides enjoyed showing off the NH climbing areas to Catharine and Nicole who join Team Cody for their first rock and mountain climbing adventure.


This past week Team Cody reached yet another milestone – leading rock climbs!!!

It all took place during the end of summer climbing trip where the main goal was to have a fun time and climb rock and mountains in a variety of areas. We had six days planned so this could easily be achieved if the bodies would do the job – hold up from day after day of climbing.

The other goal planned was to learn the skills to lead rock. Learning the skills is one part then another one comes into play when the sharp end of the rope is taken on – its the focus and the change of mindset that automatically comes on board – it happens to everyone.

We all joked around when Chris tied in for the first lead – the mood immediately took on a serious note – he was Scared Straight!!! Chris did a fine job leading multiple sport routes and Steve took on the challenge too. By days end we all had racked up a few notable leads and we all had a blast of a time.


Team Cody and Barr setting up for the day.

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A focused Chris getting some action clipping bolts on lead at Rumney Rocks.

The attentive belay is no easy task – nice work Adel .

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Repman alive and feeling the sharp mindset change with the rope hanging below his feet. Fantastic job leading these routes.


Suns out guns out – summer returns to NH.


Cathedral was also on out hit list. It was a hot day so we opted for a fast ascent of the Funhouse and Upper Refuse.

Here I am topping out on the lookout of Cathedral Ledge.

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A surprise visit from Alex yielded these great photos. Alex dropped a fixed rope and came down to see and record the action. Here is Steve mid pitch on Funhouse – a three star crack climb!!!


Chris hanging on by a thread – looking casual up high on the granite faces of Cathedral Ledge.


Scared Straight – the vision is clear – more leads and more adventure to come.

 Thanks to all of you for an awesome week on the rocks in NH.

Art Mooney

This past week my work has been with a group of 4 rock climbing instructors seeking to raise the bar for themselves and their guests. Each of these instructors put themselves and their skills on the line by guiding Alain and myself around Cathedral and Whitehorse. The end goal was certification as a Rock Instructor with the American Mountain Guides Association.

Rock Instructor Certification is designed to apply to most “cragging” style rock climbing areas in the United States. It is meant for guides or aspiring guides who work on routes that are Grade III or shorter. While these routes are multi-pitch, they are relatively straightforward and may involve complex approaches and/or descents. Time factors are  important on all of these routes.


  The photos below are of the instructors guiding us around last week. Great job to all of you for continuing your education and your commitment to guiding!!!

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Whitehorse – a pleasurable day out on the slabs with AMGA guides.



Cathedral Ledge – fantastic steep cracks and flakes.


Diedre – one of the best corner systems around the NH area.

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Rock rescue skills in action – mock drills for the instructors tool box.


Solid, efficient,movement – is number one for the climber, instructor, guide.

When choosing your guide look into the guides page. The information in bios will tell you who may be the best fit for your instruction and guiding day.

SPI guides are trained for the single pitch terrain and the RI are trained for multi pitch. Many certified SPI guides are in the process with mentorship and training for the RI. The Rock Guide is trained for the longest, complex routes.

Thanks to all of you for a great week.

Art Mooney

It was a pleasure to climb with Mike and Luke today at Cathedral and Whitehorse Cliffs. Both these guys are experienced climbers which made our day flow very fluidly. We started at Whitehorse to regain our footwork (precise movements) then we ventured over to Cathedral to play on two crack lines. By days end I felt we found the Beat as we ended up climbing 10+ pitches and took the final route to the top.


Early morning at a wet Whitehorse. I spied a dry line that went directly up to the bolts on the third pitch of Sliding Board.


Luke climbing fast and light.


Mike revisiting his old playground.


Our highpoint on Whitehorse. We descended from here – three rappels landed us on the ground.


The country club scene on the approach.


Time for some steep climbing – here is Luke on pitch one of Fun House.


Mike on the cracks and corners of Fun House.


The climbing is varied and fun – Fun House to Black Lung is a great link up to the top.


Luke flying high over the Mt Washington Valley.


Along with the climbing a few new techniques were getting attention. Mike is working on the butterfly coil.

Thanks to Mike and Luke for this day – its was a privilege to climb with both of you. I look forward to seeing you gain soon.

Art Mooney

The fall foliage was in peak display and the Cathedral and Rumney rocks were dry and crisp. I instantly knew this would be a good one, Jerry was in town for a fine weekend of climbing.

I feel exceptionally fortunate to work as a mountain guide. The climbing days can be challenging physically and mentally but they are always fun. I have the opportunity to share my passion (climbing) with others and this is rewarding in so many ways. This weekend was a reminder of how good my job is and how lucky I am to work as a guide with Jerry and a variety of interesting guest from all walks of life.

The Sunday 2 pm rains shut Jerry and I down at Rumney Rocks. This in one way was a good event for us after all we had completed two amazing days on the rocks. Our first day at Cathedral was jamb packed with a variety of cracks and face routes, and today we rallied early at Rumney keeping a brisk pace while logging in ten routes by mid afternoon. The time was right to wrap our weekend up, with many high points, a new route or two,  a couple of Rumney test piece climbs,  all totaled into 18 pitches of fine climbing, we were certainly very satisfied.


Mt Washington Valley – a vibrant display of fall colors.


Jerry topping out on P1 of Recompense.


This is the scrappy top out from Three Birches. Due to all the leaves and dirt its quite hard to tell but there is some fine climbing on this route.


Whitehorse Ledge in the distance.


Barber Wall – multiple testpiece cracks lined up.

Jerry working on Chicken Delight 5.9.


Bombardment an area classic.


Jerry just after the slab pitch of Bombardment


 Rumney Rocks – The route is False Modesty 5.8 – slick and complex. The crux moves are just above Jerry. Note the narrow strip of clean rock between the moss and lichen.


Hippos on Parade – nice corner climbing leads to the pumpy roof.


Thank you Jerry for this exceptional weekend climbing together and great way to kick off Rock Tober!!!

See you again soon,

 Art Mooney

Many climbers go to the cliffs seeking freedom. Freedom to go where you want, when you want to. You can choose the level of challenge, style of climb, even where in the world you want to go. There is no greater freedom than leading. Leading a climb requires the climber to not only be strong physically and mentally, but it requires an intimate knowledge of the gear and rope systems used to stay safe while on the cliff.

Nick and Rodger came out with Mooney Mountain Guides on a custom learn to lead course. It is important to have all the essential rope system skills in order to lead safely, and climbing with a professional guide is a great way to learn the most up to date information. Nick and Rodger are strong climbers, spending many days in the gym honing their climbing abilities. There number one goal was to take there skills into the outdoors and climb a cliff such as Cathedral Ledge in New Hampshire.


Nick, Belaying after mock leading pitch two of Fun House, Cathedral Ledge.


Rodger Belaying top of pitch two on Upper Refuse, Cathedral Ledge NH.

Day one of the two day course was spent at Cathedral Ledge where we climbed from bottom to top discussing gear placements, belay systems, cleaning a pitch, mock leading (leading while on a top-rope), building anchors, and rappelling.

Day two was spent at Rumney. Rumney is a sport climbing area, meaning the protection for the leader is already placed in the rock. This allows for the climber to concentrate on the climbing and rope systems and not each individual gear placement. When learning to lead with a professional or highly experienced recreational climber, Rumney is an excellent venue to lead a lot in a short time. Nick and Rodger were able to lead many climbs, the goal to becoming proficient and then go out and climb at Rumney on there own.


Rodger leading, Rumney NH.


Nick leading, Rumney, NH.

Nick and Rodger are now ready to continue the learning on there own. As guides we are constantly learning and tweaking our systems to become better and more skilled climbers and guides. Maybe a custom course in “leading” is right for you.

Thank you Nick and Rodger for two awesome days on the cliff.

Alex Teixeira

MMG Guide

Runout sections on nice rock is the Handren Book route description for Slabs Direct 5.7  and Stop if You Dare 5.8.

We arrived at the Whitehorse Ledge parking lot just as a few large groups were headed for the slabs. Erik and I instantly new we would be guiding the lesser traveled routes on the slabs. It was time to keep a cool head and proceed with very steady and stable footwork on the above mentioned routes.


Gang of four all secure – after our wet mossy pitch out of the woods.


Whitehorse is an amazing chuck of solid rock – many of the routes have long run outs on moderate terrain. Always engaging and sometimes very exciting climbing.


Erik leading Chris and Adel up the Slabs Direct.


Steve at the belay after the crux pitch.

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Steve enjoying the stone -an amazing day out with the team.


Erik on the upper pitches of Whitehorse.

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Good times with the team, another one of many fun trips together.


El Caballaro Blanco – done to the top!!!

Thanks to Steve, Adel, Chris and Erik.

The skies cleared up and we enjoyed a magnificent day at Cathedral. Mike and I spoke a few days before and adjusted our schedules to beat the rain as we need a good day to have the entire family out on the cliffs for some rock climbing fun.

Saturday we met up early and Mike and I climbed Thin Air and the Saigon Pitches at Cathedral. First time here for Mike and he was impressed with the quality of the stone and the fine routes we were climbing. By noon we we done and we headed to Whitehorse to meet up with the family for the rest of the day.


Cathedral ledge from Whitehorse Slabs area.

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Fun times on Thin Air, the Prow area middle, and Mike topping out on Still in Saigon.


Oh yeah Cathedral is a blast.

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Mike and Amy high up on the stone!!!


Mylee and Jackson back to NH for some rock climbing – 4th year in a row.

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Family fun – On the rock with Mooney Mountain Guides.

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What an amazing day – getting together with Mike, Amy, Mylee and Jackson.

Thanks very much for climbing in NH again.

Art Mooney

 Cathedral and Whitehorse Ledges in North Conway Nh are two prize rock climbing areas in New England. For those looking for multi pitch granite cracks and granite slabs climbs these are the spots for an excellent summer rock climbing adventure.

Victoria and Barry joined me on last years summer vacation for a climb on Cannon of the Whitney Gilman Ridge. I will say we all had and excellent time meeting and climbing together. A few weeks back Victoria and I made new plans for a 2013 summer climbing trip. The number one choice was Cathedral Ledge. It has many climbing routes, loaded with steep cracks, and its on the tough side which would make it an engaging experience for all of us.

Cathedral our first choice – since it was a wet morning we chose to drive to the top and hike down to climb the Upper Refuse route. This is usually a good climb in questionable weather, it has moderate climbing, climbs in three short pitches, and the exposure and views are awesome. We topped out just after noon and ate our lunch at the car. For the afternoon I suggested we make a quick drive to the Whitehorse Slabs for another type of climbing  – friction and footwork.

By days end we had reached our fill of the stone. It was a nice blend of two of NH prize climbing areas.


Victoria warming up on Upper Refuse.


Victoria and Barry climbing together on Cathedral Ledge.

My Mammut 9.5 Infinity ropes were running smoothly today.


A fine type of Rest & Relaxation – enjoying a NH Rock Climbing Trip.


Topping out on Cathedral – my Five Ten Hueco shoes are awesome – all day comfort, good on the cracks and edges, and excellent on the friction slabs at Whitehorse.


View into North Conway from the top of Cathedral Ledge.

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Whitehorse is one big chunk of stone. The smooth slabs are a great place to quickly cover terrain. Using the legs for power but keeping a close eye of the footwork is key to keeping yourself together on the long friction pitches.

Our choice was a fantastic route called the Sliding Board. We climbing four pitches to the headwall then rappelled to the base. The day was full of excitement and adventure, we learned alot , and we refined what we knew.

Great day climbing with Victoria and Barry.

Art Mooney

Hot and steamy has been the weather theme during the past week or so in NH.  Janet and Bill arrived from San Antonio Texas to sample two of New Hampshires finest rock climbing areas – Whitehorse and Cathedral Ledge. MMG guide Erik decided on Whitehorse for the intro to the area. The afternoon session proved to be a good idea as the sun set over the cliff giving some relief from the heat.

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Bill on the smooth crux of the Sliding Board.

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Hanging belay from two bolts on Sliding Board.

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Footwork and body position is key to movement on the slabs.


View to Echo Lake and the town of North Conway.


On our second day I decide on the Upper Refuse route at Cathedral. Here is Janet using a finger crack to climb while Bill coaches the upcoming moves.


Top of Cathedral Ledge – Bill in a wildly exposed position.


Janet climbing strong on the exit moves to the lookout ledge.

Thanks to Janet and Bill for coming to NH to climb. They both enjoyed amazing weekend rock climbing adventure. Erik and I were excited to be their guides and show them our home climbing areas.

Art Mooney