Rumney Rocks

Troop 1 from Northboro Mass climbed at Rumney Rocks this past Saturday. The day was full of excitement and challenges. After our morning skills session the Scouts were put to the rocks of Rumney. Tying knots, climbing, belaying and lowering skills were practiced in full force with three groups at various areas.

Check out these fun photos of the day.



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Thanks to all the Scouts and leaders.

The MMG staff of guides – Art, Steve, Phil

Kelly and Bob ventured north from Philadelphia in hopes of climbing in North Conway this Memorial Day weekend; however, the storms soaked the cliffs.  With Whitehorse running with water, they drove over to Rumney and found some dry rock, sunny weather, and stellar routes.

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Kelly working her way up Beginner’s Route.


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Bob nearing the top with someone starting up Bolt Line.

After warming up and getting their feet underneath them, we headed over to the Parking Lot Wall to find that Glory Jeans was open.  We were able to climb a little more before the skies opened up with an afternoon shower.

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Bob on the ledge ready to step over the void.


Thanks to Kelly and Bob for their positive energy and enthusiasm!


Todd Goodman

MMG Guide

  Mooney Mountain Guides calls this blog posted trip the New Hampshire sampler – a day of sport climbing, a mountain adventure, and an alpine rock day on Cannon Cliff.  This three day action packed event is not one for a week heart or mind.

Steve is a motivated man, when he sets his sights on a climb, a goal, a project he gives it 100+ percent. This was crystal clear from the beginning. United a not so favorite airline of his canceled his flight earlier this week and  within a short time Steve was in the car racing from New York to New Hampshire. The weather pattern was solid, a mid week break from Peppercom was needed, and the body and mind were ready to climb.

Rumney Rocks was the first stop on Tuesday. The skies had cleared from the weekends low pressure and the cliff was drying out fast. A visit to the Jimmy Cliff got us off on the right tune, Bonsai was next with a fine display of sending a project by MMG guide Alex, and then to complete we ventured over to the Main wall for a steep technical face climb that put on the first of many pumps during the week.


A quick cardio workout romping up the Clippidy Do Dah!!!


Main Cliff action as Steve nears the belay.


Off to a good start.


The great weather continued on Wednesday which happened to be our Mt Washington mountain day. To both our surprise the mountain was in late winter condition with snow and ice covered trails from the Cog Station to the summit. There has been over 1 foot of new snow since May first which is quite unusual even for the rock pile. The new snow along with brisk temps and a stiff breeze make us feel like we took a step back in time by a few months.

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Thanks to Julbo for keeping our vision in order – excellence with eyewear for mountain travelers and more.


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Bluebird skies, wild rime ice, all in all a spectacular day.

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The summit cone was tough – bear down and keep on trucking.


The prize Steve’s 13th time on the summit


The base area – four thousand feet lower – in spring time condition.


Our third day – time to ramp it up!!!

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Cannon Cliff is New Hampshires finest alpine rock area. Our 1 hour approach to the Whitney  Gilman wanders up the steep talus field to the base of the serpentine ridge. The WG ridge is a classic old school 5.7 route first completed in 1929. This was our last day objective and we were set to take it to the top.

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All the movement skills are put to the test climbing on Cannon. Cracks, faces, loose shattered rock, wildy exposed moves as one works back and forth along the 600ft ridge climb. The Whitney Gilman Ridge can make one feel like they are climbing in the Alps.

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The final pitch – Steve jamming and liebacking the final corner to the top.


The descent – snow and ice again?

Micro spikes on the Guide Tennies was the ticket home.


Steve and MMG guide Alex blasting home on the return.

Steve has come to New Hampshire many times to climb with MMG. This trip was one of the finest, it was

full of SERF –  Surprises, Educational, Rewards, Fun time for all.

Thanks to Steve – for this amazing three day sampler.

Art Mooney

Early season is tough.  With the improved weather, excitement fills the air and climbers get anxious not only to get out but also to send.  Attacking a project too high too soon often results in injury, putting the kibosh on training until you heal.  Dialing down routes can help maximize your training early season (and throughout the year).

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Several years ago, I was climbing with a friend of mine at Rumney, and we were warming up before heading off to our respective projects.  After completing a route that I enjoyed but did not climb smoothly, I muttered, “That was sloppy.” I had wished I felt more comfortable on the route.

“Don’t untie,” he said.  “Dial it down.”  So I climbed it again, much more smoothly.  When I reached the ground the second time, he smiled.  “Don’t untie.  You’re not done.”  I sighed but started again.  I moved more fluidly than the previous times and anticipated the next handhold and my feet found the footholds.  The fourth time…yes, he made me climb it four times…I felt solid.


The more familiar you are with a route, the greater chance you have to move efficiently, grabbing the holds the best way the first time or finding the right footholds without hanging too much on your arms.  Each spring, when I have been off the rock for several months, I gravitate to the routes where my body knows the motions like dialing the number to an old friend.  Often times, these routes are either the same grade or harder than the routes that I am trying to onsight.  Because I am so familiar with these routes I have dialed down, I am performing challenging moves without wasting too much energy trying to figure out the beta.  As a result, I can climb harder for a longer period of time, enabling me to get into climbing shape faster.


This season when you climb a route that you enjoy, don’t rush off too quickly for the next one.                                                          Spend the extra time to work through the moves. Dial it down.

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Todd Goodman

MMG Guide

Mooney Mountain Guides is excited to offer a spring special. Our crag skills seminars will help you get ready for your best climbing session yet.

Crag Skills Seminar


Choose one of four options:

1)  Top-Rope Construction.

2)  Introduction to Traditional Climbing.

3)  Gym to Crag Transition.

4) Self Rescue

Combine any two for a comprehensive two-day seminar.


Who: Learn from expert guides who not only teach these skills but apply them every single day in the field. Our guides are trained and certified by the AMGA and use the most up-to-date methods in the field.  4:1 guide to guest ratio.

What: You can expect to learn and apply the skills needed to perform independently at the crag with your friends or family.

When: Seminars will be held May 1st – May 20th. 

Where: Seminars will be held in four different locations based on interest and availability. These areas include Pawtuckaway State Park, Rumney, Echo Crag, and Crow Hill in Massachusetts.

Why: Climbing can be dangerous, especially if a climber is unprepared and underestimates the risks. Receiving training from experts allows a climber to choose the appropriate technical systems for the situation, make conservative decisions when evaluating risk, and reduce the time to gain independence.


For more information:

Please vist

E-mail at [email protected]

or Call Alex


Jerry and I have been on the ice for the past five days at a variety of areas. Jerry was looking to refine, steep climbing techniques on pillars and corners, climb a new alpine gully, and spend some time taking on the lead end of the rope. We kept our focus for the week and were treated to some fine ice conditions.



The Penguin route.

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Dracula Right and Left


Trestle Cut area.


Newfound Lake


Jerry on lead – Duofold.


The Flume


Shoestring Gully


Crawford Notch area





The week was sooo good – thanks Jerry much appreciated.

Art Money

This past weekend Rodger and Steve, college roommates, came to New Hampshire to try their hand at ice climbing. Although one now lives in Colorado and the other in Virginia, the two make an effort to go on trips together a couple times a year.

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Steve working a slab at Kinsman

Their adventure began at Kinsman Notch, a primer climbing area that typically has beautiful blue ice, even when other areas don’t. The guys climbed slabs, steep ice, thin ice and fat ice. Running the gambit of conditions, learning to read the ice like a book helping them climb more efficiently.

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Many climbs to be had at Rumney

Day two it was time for Rumney, and its south facing cliffs perfect for a cold day. At this time of year, Rumney offers a variety of excellent climbs from the moderate, to the difficult. Rodger and Steve took multiple laps each on the steep ice employing the skills they learned the day before. After a full day of climbing, everyone went home happy to have had such a great weekend on the ice.

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Rodger putting an ! on the weekend.

Thank you Steve & Rodger for a great weekend.

Alex Teixeira

Selsun Blue was the objective for this day. The brutal cold weather steered me to finding an ice line on the warmer sunny ice flows at Rumney Rocks. Ken and I tried Selsun Blue a few years back and now it was time for a rematch. Kens ice kit has been refined with new lighter boots, modern tools and mono points. To prepare Ken has been working on movements skills on the steeper ice flows and today our goal was to put it all together.

We arrived at Selsun Blue and were quite surprised to find much of the ice route laying on the ground in huge ice blocks. The deluge we had over a week ago washed the main portion of the flow completely out. Our plan quickly adjusted to the Cave Route.

MMG Guide Alex joined us for the day an he racked up with gear and led the Cave Route. He climbed brittle hard ice for the first portion then found a wet sticky vein in the cave and took this to the top. It is amazing how and where the water flows on the ice – even on the coldest days of the year. Cave route was climbed and then a top rope was set for a nice series of stacked pillars on Selsun Right. Ken delicately climbed upward enjoying this technical piece of ice.


The Selsun Blue – out of the game.


Ken styling the moves on the thin pillar.


Alex finding a sweet spot on the Cave Route.

Our afternoon led us down to the Meadows area where we chatted about our next routes. Ken wanted to try the Newfound Lake area. We hopped into the cars cranked up the heat and headed that way. Newfound is mostly shaded and the routes have been in great shape this year,

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Ken on the long route called Bloodline. We found fantastic conditions on this route.

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Newfound Lake – ice above and below.

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Thanks to Ken and Alex for a fun day on the ice. We found good ice lines at two areas Rumney and Newfound.

Art Mooney

The ice climb at Rumney called the Geographic Factor is certainly a prize of an ice line. The climb is guarded by a long steep approach and is hidden from view as it is tucked away in the Giant Man alcove at the Hinterlands Area. You must make the hike to see if the route is in shape or suitable for your climbing day.

Jerry and I cruised the cliffs today with Franky Lee as our warm up then onward to find out if Geo was in condition. Upon our arrival at the base we noticed a substantial overhang of ice at the crux area. Not sure if this would go – we decided to take a further look and climb to the half way point. It would either go or we would descend from there.

A bit of cleaning was needed to remove the fragile daggers of ice that barred the upward moves – once completed it was a go. We were very engaged by the technical and strenuous moves for twenty feet or so. Then is was fat and sticky ice to the top.

You must get out and try, seeing the route is not enough, feeling it is much better. Some days are just right for the climb and today was the right day for Jerry and I on the Geo.


First view of the route.

IMG_1141Jerry shaking out – just past the pumpy overhang.


Wet and sticky ice on the sunny upper half of the route.


 Crux overhang – three to four feet to clear.


Great send of the Geographic Factor.

Art Mooney

Rock Tober its called – the time when we have clear and cool at night but during the day the sun is bright warming the rocks up to a perfect temperature. The Main Cliff is perfect on most days from now on – avoided in the heat of summer but a refreshing place this time of year. Aubrey and I spent our training session working on the steep and technical routes. Progress is being made as the sequences are refined and sent and the body gets stronger. Soon enough will be the day to send.


Baker River Valley.


Heading to Gold Bug.



Joyce on the main attraction – Underdog.



Know Ethics – slippery and sequential.

Aubrey – another good time – you are climbing well!!!

Thank you.

Art Mooney