Ice Climbs

Every year, each season takes its own shape and form.  This past ice season started earlier than I had expected, and I got in more ice days than I had in previous years.  As the season nears its end, I was psyched to get in a few more enjoyable days with solid people.

I had the pleasure of working with an REI group on President’s Weekend.  This course is listed as an introductory to ice climbing, but most of the individuals had rock climbing experience, so we were able to hit the ground running.

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Tori picking a good route

On day one, they pushed themselves on the shorter but stout routes in Franconia Notch in sunny, 40-degree weather.  We left the puffies in the bag, shed the layers, and took out our sunglasses for the day.

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Henry starting up

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Sehrish getting into the steeper stuff

They climbed so hard on the first day, I wondered how much they would have for day two at Kinsman Notch.  They kept going.  They applied and refined some technique we showed them and they made it up the harder climbs.

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Nav and Meg at the top of their respective climbs

 

Every group has its own personality and bonds together in its own way.  The individuals connected quickly, and their instant comradery was impressive.  They offered belays without hesitation, took pictures of each other, and offered verbal support the entire weekend.  The purpose of these weekend excursions is two-fold: to introduce/develop the ice climbing skills and knowledge and to have fun.  This group accomplished both.

The next day, I took my two children ice climbing for the first time.  We decided to get an early start at Kinsman to ensure that we would beat the crowds and get the route we wanted.  Unlike the previous two days, the colder Monday temps resulted an icier approach.  Instead of moving quickly up the trail with few layers on, as I did the day before, I moved more deliberately and spotted the kids at the many sections that had become slippery.

Watching my two young children battle both their fear and the ice, I marveled at their persistence and tenacity.  Some of their struggles, like kicking their feet in or pulling the tool from the ice, are different than older climbers, but task of managing of fear remains present in us all.  Seeing the juxtaposition between the two groups and the way each managed his or her own fear and excitement was quite insightful for me as climber, a guide, and a parent.

This recent warm stretch is melting most of the ice, resulting in a canceled trip this weekend and marking the end of my ice season.   Fortunately, the rock season is around the corner.  With more of these warm days, it might arrive early this year as well.

Todd Goodman

MMG Guide

Mooney Mountain Guides and Mammut teamed up for the very successful Mammut Alpine School ice climbing trip. This was MMG’s and MAS’s first trip with more to come.  Each of our guests joined in for this weekend of instruction, followed by experience and mileage on the ice climbs. By the end of the weekend we all had climbed over 1000 ft of ice at Frankenstein Cliff and on Mt Willard in Crawford Notch NH. The Highland Center Lodge was fabulous, the food was delicious, our rooms were quiet,  our meeting space was spacious and private and the staff was super friendly.

Join us for our next MAS  trip on Mt Washington Weekend climb over St Patty’s Day weekend March 17 – 19, 2017.

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 Our MAS team of Art, Laurie, Jodi, Andrew, Sarah and in front MMG guide Mike. Smiles of enjoyment from the rewards of our first ice climbing day. each of us reached new heights on this warm and sunny day at Frankenstein Cliffs

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Jodi and Laurie working together for Jodi’s first ascent the Trestle Slab ice climb. This was Jodi’s first experience on the ice and  Laurie came with miles of mountain and ice climbing experience. This mix created a perfect situation for both ladies to empower  and climb to the top.

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Mammut, the brand is well known and highly respected. Mammut clothing and equipment is innovative alpine mountain gear that stands up to the rigorous test of day to day use in extreme mountain environments. Mammut is one of  the finest mountain climbing product companies in the outdoor market.

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Jodi climbing the steeper ice on the Standard Route at Frankenstein. Jodi learned the basic moves then she was able to turn on her  focus and determination to ascend each ice climb with power and grace.

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The AMC Highland Center – our meeting and lodging location.

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The Highland Center nestled in Crawford Notch is a perfect location for easy access to a variety of ice climbs.

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Laurie setting up anchors and the belay as she guides Jodi on the ice. MMG guide Mike is nearby coaching and giving advise as needed.

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Beautiful ice on the East Slabs right on Mt Willard. We all climbed to the top then rappelled back down for another route nearby.

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Andrew gaining comfort  in this new vertical ice environment. Andrew learned  how to place solid ice tools, how to place the feet by finding the small ledges to kick good steps into and also the importance of flexibility and balance.

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 Sarah having a blast, high on the ice above the roadway on the East Slabs area of Mt Willard.

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Jodi and Laurie climbing side by side on the East Slabs right. Mike set up a parallel rope system so the ladies could climb together. This technique is faster, guests stay warmer, and its tons of fun for all.

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 Standard Route in the afternoon, one more ice pitch to complete our first day. Sarah and Andrew coming into the cave area belay station on Standard Route.

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 A very successful Mammut Alpine School weekend on the ice. The conditions were fantastic, the crew was awesome, all in all a very fun weekend full of excitement  and challenge.

Thank you all!!!

Art Mooney

Mooney Mountain Guides has a new ice climbing course which I termed the Mileage Plus+.  This is a specialized course for ice and rock climbers seeking to fast track their movement and technical skills. Under the mentorship of Art, Laurie has developed a plan with a mutual commitment of time and energy.  The Mileage Plus+ days are full of education followed by mileage which equates to experience. This winter Laurie and I have immersed ourselves together into the finer aspects of the ice world. Our instructional topics include movement skills, ice protection, ice anchoring, belay techniques, v threads and once again Mileage Plus+. Over regular intervals Laurie is quickly advancing, with a solid understanding of the many intricacies of the ice.

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Kinsman Notch, a fabulous area for moving into ice leading. Laurie has set off on Lepricuans Lament NEI2. This route is perfect for Laurie to sharpen her mental focus to lead,  to place ice screws at regular intervals,and  then set up the anchor at the top.

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The ice climber can never take a casual approach, stay connected to the tools, to the gear, to the ice. Laurie has three solid points of contact to free up her right hand to place ice screw protection on the pitch.

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As Laurie approaches the top she is deciding where to place her top out ice screw. It is the rounded out bulges with thin ice above that may look easy but climb quite hard, thus need the extra attention and protection.

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Laurie is climbing on Shamrock NEI3. Pictured is the lower crux which a very steep corner leading to a rest. Laurie is keeping her cool knowing that once on the above ice ledge she can rest and re energize for the remainder of the climb.

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Laurie brought along these tasty home made energy bars of dates, walnuts, and cacao.

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The Beast at Kinsman – here Laurie is testing her movement skills on a steep NEI4+

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Multi pitch transitions is where the technical action takes place. Being able to swap leads with efficiency is key to keeping the flow, staying warm, reducing the time and risk on the climb.

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A backed up V thread – a recommended technique before committing the entire team to this tunnel into the ice.

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Last week was a huge break through for Laurie and I. We logged in many hours on the ice together, Laurie took on the task on leading the routes and we worked on fine tuning skills along the way. This all happened in the White Mountains of NH, one of the finest ice climbing venues in the world.

Thank you Laurie for this amazing experience.

Art Mooney

 

3:11…I rolled out of bed.  My alarm was going to go off anyway in about a half an hour, so I didn’t think it made sense to try and fall back asleep.  After making some coffee and gathering my gear, I headed outside when I heard Art’s truck pull into my driveway.

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Last year the day after Thanksgiving, I was rock climbing.  Christmas day, in fact, my wife and I climbed at the 5.8 crag in fall conditions.  Today, we were headed to Cannon for the classic ice climb the Black Dike.

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We were the first in the parking lot.  Excited, we packed up and headed down the trail.  Our headlamps shining the way, I noticed that Art’s headlamp was brighter than mine.  He told me that he had changed the batteries the night before.  Hmmm…when was the last time I changed the batteries in mine?  Two minutes later, I realized that I should have done the same when my headlamp went out.  Luckily, Art had a spare in the truck.  We dropped our packs, picked up the spare light, and headed out again.

Over the years, I have hiked up the talus field, wondering which of the many paths to choose.  This morning, however, I had the luxury of simply following Art’s footprints.  Periodically, I would instinctively reach my hand out for a rock only to see Art’s mitt print, which felt reassuring.  I couldn’t see the cliff initially, for the darkness and clouds shrouded its face.  I wondered what John Bouchard was thinking when he first ascended the route, ropeless.  For some, The Black Dike serves as a test piece; for others, it serves as a classic climb that people do every year.  For me, I was planning to follow it for the first time.  Over the years, I had seen it while I was rock climbing at Cannon, and it looked loose – blocks teetering on another – nothing in that area looked secure.  My friend RJ once told me that winter at Cannon was safer because all the blocks were frozen together.  I reminded myself of this theory as we neared the cliff.

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By the time I had arrived at the base, Art had already stomped out an area, put on his harness, and was sorting through some gear.  I tried to move quickly but deliberately.  Looking up the route, I saw the line, but I had no idea of the conditions.  I saw snow and some ice and hoped that we would make it to the top.  I put Art on belay, and before I knew it, he was off.  Moving smoothly through the lower section, he placed a piece and traversed out to the right.  Before I knew it, he had set an anchor and put me on belay.

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By the time I reached the anchor, I had knocked off some of the rust.  The picks went in ok, but the feet needed some work.  After clipping in, I looked up and tried to figure out exactly where the line went.  When Art took off for the next pitch, the leader of the party below us started his way up.  Art brushed snow off several places.  Then brushed some more.  Then some more.  I looked down at my snow covered pack that was hanging from the anchor and smiled.  I cleared some of the snow from my pack and myself.  Luckily, I was nice and cozy wearing the hoods of the Mammut Ultimate Hoody and the Broad Peak Jacket.  The former I would wear during the climb, the latter I used to stay warm at the belay.

Ultimate Alpine SO Hooded Jacket Men

Mammut Ultimate Hoody

https://www.mammut.ch/US/en_US/Alpine-Climbing/Mixed-and-Ice-Climbing/Ultimate-Alpine-SO-Hooded-Jacket-Men/p/1010-22180-0001

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Mammut Broad Peak Jacket

https://www.mammut.ch/US/en_US/B2C-Kategorie/Alpine-Climbing/Mixed-and-Ice-Climbing/Broad-Peak-IN-Hooded-Jacket-Men/p/1010-18460-0051

 

Art placed a nut, moved left, provided some beta for me, and worked his way up to a corner.  The leader below me anchored to my right, and before I knew it, I was on belay.  As I climbed to the stopper, I tried to remember what Art had said.  I had a vague recollection, but I felt out of balance as I adjusted and readjusted my feet.  I brushed some more snow from the rock ledges and found the flat surfaces of the rock.  The party below me gave words of encouragement, reminding me of how supporting the climbing community can be most of the time.  I took my time and moved past the awkward section and into a snowy corner.  I turned around to see a perspective of Cannon I had never seen before.  Snow covered the usually teetering blocks and talus below.  The scene looked serene, a word I never thought I would use to describe this cliff.  The light mist hung in the air, and I knew not to linger too long, for the weather could change quicker than you might think.

The nook for the next belay provided some shelter, and we stopped to refuel and hydrate for the final section.  Art moved through the final pitch stopping periodically to place a screw or a piece of pro.  He warned me of the sections that were steeper than they looked (I thought they looked pretty steep from where I was anyway).

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When he pulled the rope tight, I took down the anchor and began to climb.  Despite some awkward sections, I found movement quite enjoyable.  I could hear Alex’s voice remind me to use “small, ticky tack feet” as I worked my way up the steep sections, which required precise feet and encouraged purposeful and deliberate movement.  For the thin sections, I remembered Tim’s advice and tapped one of the picks with the other tool and delicately moved my way up.

Near the top, I even used an armbar to wedge my way up an off-width section.  I hooked deep into a crack and felt a decent sized rock shift and begin to pull out.  “Of course,” I thought, “what would a trip to Cannon be without at least one loose rock?”  By the time I had reached the top, I felt elated about finishing the climb and slightly disappointed that the climbing was over.

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We ate some more food, coiled the ropes, packed our gear, and headed down the trail.  We reached the truck and headed home.  Later that night, I reflected upon the day.  Many friends had spoken about the climb for years, and some even suggested we climb it, but the timing never seemed to work out.  While I had tried not to build up the climb for fear of being disappointed, I had wondered for years what it would be like to climb it.  I am pleased to say that it lived up to the hype.

To start the ice season climbing the Black Dike in November is encouraging.  I am excited for the coming months and the adventures that lay ahead.

Get out there and take advantage of the season.  I hope to see you out there!

Todd Goodman

MMG Guide

Jerry Gale and I traveled to the Canadian Rockies for ten days of ice climbing in early March. This trip was our grand finale for our 2015/16 ice climbing season. Over the winter we climbed, we trained, and readied ourselves for the cold difficult ice routes of the north. Upon our arrival and through out the trip we both were truly surprised at what we found. The temperatures remained constant, hovering around freezing levels, the ice was generally fat and sticky, and the routes plentiful with so many to choose!!! 

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The Canadian Rockies viewed from Banff

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Our first day we found ourselves walking up to this local favorite – The Pilsnar Pillar. This gem was our prize climb, right up the center pillar.

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                      Inside the cave behind Pilsnar Pillar.                        

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Wicked Wanda is located in the South Ghost area. The Ghost areas comprised of two main areas the north and south. Wicked Wanda was our first choice as it was the easier to get to. Easy being barred by a 10 mile dirt road, the infamous big hill, and gravel river crossings.

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The north Ghost is another story. Both Jerry and I wanted this place in a bad way. Home to the Sorcerer pictured above and another classic called Hydrophobia. We settled on this unknown route, the Sorcerer. We were gifted with this picture as were rounded the bend early in the morning.

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A spectacular afternoon on the Sorcerer!!!

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My  friend Dale made this Sorcerer journey possible. As you can see the a rental car would not make these river crossings. Dale had the right rig for the task the Toyota Tacoma in 4×4 low.

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 Snowline – the center, Moonlight the left were two long flows of ice in tip top shape. This ice climbing area was south of Canmore in the Evan- Thomas Creek area in the Kananaskis foothills.

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 Snowline – a skinny route that spiraled its way to the top

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Mammut in action – the Nordwand GTX Boot, Trion Guide Pack, Neon Light Pack, Nordwand Gloves and much more. Thanks to the Mammut and the Vermont staff  for all the help gearing up for this fine adventure.

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Our grand finale was Curtain Call. A brilliant climb in our minds. We approached in the dark and the first light displayed this – a very technical looking ice route with an overhang at the top. We both new this would be our grand prize for the season.

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This is our third and final pitch. Beautiful stemming up the corner leads to the imposing roof section. Picked out by others, the transition over the overhang was doable for us.

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Jerry topping out high above the Icefields Parkway.

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Wild ice formations on the Curtain Call – Canadian Rockies.

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Jerry a long time partner who is committed to the sport. Whether it be rock, ice or mountain climbs Jerry seeks out the cleanest line. We both work together to climb the prize lines of the area together.

So much thanks to Jerry.

Art Mooney

Already looking into he next ice season? Please get in touch for a late winter trip to the Canadian Rockies!!! Contact Art.

Early in my teaching career, I was assigned the assistant coach of a junior varsity lacrosse team.  I had never played lacrosse; I did not even know the basic rules. I felt well outside my comfort zone.  Despite my trepidation, I entered the season determined to contribute positively to the team.

Fortunately, the program included a number of excellent and experienced coaches who would mentor me for the season.  The varsity head coach explained the system they used from the freshman to the varsity team and the fundamentals they focused on reinforcing.  The JV head coach assigned me certain tasks and responsibilities within my skill set that set me up for success rather than failure.  Having previously coached other sports for several years, I was already able to help the players with the mental aspect of the game – readying oneself for a game and maintaining one’s cool in challenging situations – and as the season continued, I branched out offering more sport specific advice.  That season reinforced in me the value of venturing out of my comfort zone and encouraged me to do so in the future.

Fast forwarding nearly twenty years, I found myself standing at the base of Kinsman Notch this winter working with an REI Ice Climbing group.  Ice climbing?  I’m more of a rock climber; how did I get here?

For years, I had gone out once or twice a season for an ice climb.  While I enjoyed the sport itself and saw the cross-over of various skills, the cold discouraged me.  I am not tough (anyone who knows me would heartily agree), but it’s more than simply not wanting to be cold.  I love cross-country skiing and running in the winter, and I feel a great sense of empowerment enjoying these activities when the temperature drops.  But for even longer than I have been climbing, I have had joint implant for my right ring finger.  As a result, I need to tape my ring finger to my middle finger for support when I climb, and the poor circulation in my hand is exacerbated by the cold.  My finger has turned blue several times in colder hockey rinks.

About four or five years ago, I followed the advice and encouragement of my friend and mentor, Art, and decided to expand my guiding repertoire.  That winter I began to assist the MMG winter trips (though I had not signed on for the single digit temperatures at my first MMG winter training day).  Underdressed because I lacked the proper clothing but anxious to learn, I soaked in both the big picture topics that we discussed that day as well as the subtle tips the more experienced guides provided.  From others’ suggestions on how to swing the axe more effectively and efficiently to Mike’s advice of placing the carabiner in one’s teeth to avoid its sticking to one’s lips, I broadened my knowledge base.  On the drive home, it seemed like an hour before I could feel my toes, but I left the day excited about the upcoming opportunities.

A couple of weeks later, I shadowed a weekend REI Mount Washington trip.  Armed with a borrowed set of Gore-Tex bibs, a warmer puffy, and a set of proper mittens and gloves, the cold was a non-factor.  In fact, I needed to take off a layer on the last leg to the summit because I was overheating.  I spent the weekend absorbing all the tips that Art and Jim offered: adjusting the grips on the poles, carving out steps, and effective layering of clothes to name a few.  By the time we returned to the truck on the final day of the trip, I was exhausted but hungry to learn and to experience more.

In the following few winters, I climbed more with my friends and helped out with the ice climbing trips for the school where I teach.  This past year, I even invested in a set of boots and axes and took advantage of additional free time this January by climbing recreationally with friends and working with my more experienced colleagues on several of the MMG ice climbing trips.

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Following a climb near the Greeley Pond

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At the base of the pitch.

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Happy to have the rope above me

 

Although more knowledgeable about the sport of ice climbing than lacrosse, I felt less sure of myself than guiding rock.  However, I recognized that despite the different terrain and techniques between ice and rock climbing, the heart of guiding remains the same: build and maintain a level of trust in the guide and the safety systems to help guests venture out of their comfort zone by providing them with enough advice (but not too much) so that they can accomplish the task.  Each day, I observed the way Alex, Erik, or Tim taught the fundamental skills, and I tried to apply those lessons to my own teaching. I learned so much conversing with each of them on the drives to and from the crag as well.  And I learned from the guests on those trips.  Seeing them struggle and succeed, I talked with them about the process.  I reflected on what helped each climber most and saw a variety of effective ways to present an idea.

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Erik teaching a lesson to a group

I have found through my experiences as a teacher, a guide, and a climber myself that stretching one’s comfort zones is when the greatest learning takes place.  This past winter, I certainly applied this mindset to my own winter climbing, and I sought out situations where I felt safe but less confident in the past.  Carrying these lessons forward, I am excited about this coming rock season and all that it will encompass.

For me, the calculated risks that I took yielded tremendous success for myself as a climber, a guide, and an individual.  I encourage others to do to same.

Good luck on the rocks in the coming months.

Todd Goodman

MMG

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To me, above all, climbing is a pursuit, a lifestyle that is best shard with others. For generations of climbers, skills have been passed down through mentorship. The 50′s, 60′s, and 70′s did not have a lot of climbers. Climbing was not apart of the main stream media. Gear was primitive and hard to come by. Climbing was better referred to as an art-form, than a sport. The equipment of the day closer to a hammer and chisel, than to the space age equipment of today. The 80′s brought on the popularity of sport climbing, and as a result climbing became slightly more accessible to the average joe. The 90′s and 00′s made this even more true with the increased popularity of climbing gym’s, ABS, and mainstream media.

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It is awesome, especially for a working mountain guide, to  have the pursuit of climbing be more popular than ever. However, a part of me feels that the most special part of this life, the mentorship, has been, at least a little, diluted down by the main stream. The main-streamness of climbing has led many young/new climbers into believing that you can learn all you need to know from the gym, that, if you are strong you can go anywhere, and its every climber for his or her self.

There is an individual who I met this ice climbing season that has defied the trend. A relatively new climber, but a lifetime lover of wild places. A passionate people person, Stephanie has created her own climbing community by combining the powers of the mainstream with the magic of  mentorship.

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Nature Girls is a “Meet Up” group with over 600 followers! Just one example of how modern times are changing the climbing world. Stefanie is the boss and she has done some amazing work this year. On top of her own busy life and climbing goals, she has taken the time to run two ice climbing trips with Mooney Mountain Guides. I’m not sure why the guiding gods were so good to MMG by allowing us to work with such a great group, but I am grateful for the opportunity.

I can’t say enough positive things about this group. Women from all walks of life, getting together to climb frozen waterfalls. So cool! The most inspiring aspect of the Nature Girls is their drive to learn more about the sport, and not in a rapid way, but how they enjoy the process. Through Stefanie the Nature Girls are seeking guidance to help push their limits. I can’t say the MMG is sensei to this great group of gals, but I am honored to have helped provide a little guidance along their way. My hope is that MMG can help Stef provide amazing climbing experiences to her followers, and push them in the direction of seeking a climbing mentor.

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I so look forward to many climbing trips with the Nature Girls on the ice and rock. I think there are many great experience to come. I must send out a big Thank You to Stefanie, for being the driving force behind Nature Girls and all the have accomplished.

If your interested in learning more, or joining a trip please check out:

http://www.meetup.com/Nature-Girls/

Ice routes and conditions are vastly improving in NH. The warmer days and cold nights give the necessary water flow to the routes.  At a rapid rate I am seeing the ice conditions ramp up.

On News Years Day I gave an ice tour of Mt Willard to my good friends Masia and Todd and to Terry. A bright and colorful day we certainly had. We climbed both lower and upper Hitchcock gullys and found the entire route to be in fine shape.

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 The colors on winter!!!

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Terry working through the tricky rock step on Lower Hitchcock.

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Terry and I had a blast spending the day with Todd and Masia. They are so psyched to be climbing ice on New Years day.

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Han Chen and I met very early today Jan 2. Our goal was to be first for the NH classic Black Dike ice climb.

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First place did not happen but we did meet friends on the route. Soon enough we were high on the ice enjoying a warm day, sticky ice, and building conditions.

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So much thanks to you all for getting out climbing ice in the NH mountains. I enjoyed every moment and look forward to more good climbs together.

Art Mooney

Its a rare day when guests are rope gunning for guides, but then i guess this was a rare week. Jerry the Gale Force continued his epic season climbing with Art. They had a stellar day on the on the east face of Willard. A few days before that, George joined us again and also took the sharp end on the east face of Willard with Alex. The snow is deep between the climbs, but the ice is great right now!

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Also this week, Erik and Alex chose to use some rest days to hunt down the last of the powder from last weeks storms. These days were just long enough to help work the lactic acid out of legs from the previous week of work, as well as to put a day long powder grin on our faces :)

Following our week of ice we transitioned right into a weekend of ice. On Saturday Alex ventured north to Lake Willoughby with guests Mark and Matt.

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This is the premiere venue in the east for big, bad, bold ice climbs! starting the day in -20 temps tempered the expectations some, but they still managed a couple of multi-pitch 4+ lines. Certainly a day for all to be proud of.

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On Saturday and Sunday, Erik had two couples for an introduction to ice climbing. Day one was spent at Kinsman Notch, honing in the basics. Day two was spent basking in the sun (first day temps were above freezing in almost a month!) at Newfound Lake.

Thanks to all our guests from this weekend! we hope to see you again soon.

The Mooney Mountain Crew